Autobiology with Jennifer Little-Fleck

Boosting Brain Health and Wellness using the NanoVi with Rowena Gates

August 17, 2023 Jennifer Little-Fleck
Autobiology with Jennifer Little-Fleck
Boosting Brain Health and Wellness using the NanoVi with Rowena Gates
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Imagine if you could harness the power of water in your body to boost your brain health and overall wellness. That's the promise of our captivating conversation with Rowena Gates, the principal of Eng3 Corporation, as we unveil the revolutionary NanoVi device. This distinct equipment works by influencing cellular water in such a way that it champions protein activities, essentially bettering the environment for proteins to function optimally. Intriguingly, the energy used by your brain during a mere two hours of focused thinking can equate to that expended when running a marathon!

Our episode takes a deep dive into the advanced realms of water science and its impact on protein folding. Together with Rowena, we navigate the energy state required for proteins to fold and how NanoVi device delivers the energy to create exclusion zone water. We also unravel red light therapy, its unique workings, and how it affects your body's water. Furthermore, we discover how the NanoVi influences proteins ingested through food. 

We tackle some grave health concerns like Alzheimer's, its link to protein function and how NanoVi can assist. Unearth the significance of water for energy transfer within your cells and for brain health. Rowena imparts her knowledge on how artificial intelligence can help maintain the folded shape of a protein and how NanoVi has been investigating protein damage, oxidative stress, and DNA damage related to other health issues. Lastly, we reveal how NanoVi can assist recovery for athletes, non-athletes as well as those recuperating from chronic illnesses or surgery. Join us for this enlightening episode and discover how you can leverage water science for your wellness!

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Jennifer:

Hey, welcome back. We are talking about a super fun device today. Every once in a while we get to have, you know, I get to go to conferences and have fun playing around with things, and this was one of those devices that I was like, oh my God, this is so cool, I have to have this. So just a little bit of background.

Jennifer:

When you think about your DNA, what your DNA is is a blueprint yes, for your genetics, but what it actually is making that blueprint is proteins, and all that's all your DNA does. Your is is tells yourselves to make a whole bunch of amino acids, and then it tells your your DNA tells your body how to put these amino acids together to make very specific proteins. Your proteins do everything in the body. Everything is made of proteins, all the enzymes that are necessary to carry out all the biochemical reactions in your body. Proteins, yeah, so everything is made of protein.

Jennifer:

So what happens when the proteins don't fold correctly or they break? You break, your body stops working, you age, you age faster, you get disease, so on and so forth. So what if you could repair those proteins and have them refold and start working again? That would be pretty awesome, right? Yeah, well, that's what this device does that I'm going to talk about today. So my guest is Rowena Gates and, along with her husband, hans Eng, who is a engineer originally from Germany, together they are Eng3 Corporation, and this is. This is just a cool episode, all about technology and the brain. You know I love talking about the brain, so enjoy.

Intro:

You're listening to auto biology, the podcast where you can learn a little biology now so you can think for yourself later. Introducing your host, who dreams of being on an episode of Star Trek, as the quirky biologist who saves the day, jennifer Little Fleck.

Jennifer:

Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of Auto Biology. Today I am discussing a really revolutionary approach to not only brain health but overall body reparative functions, with a focus on your body's proteins, and I'm having this discussion with the principal of Eng3 Corporation, rowena Gates. Rowena, so lovely to have you on today.

Rowena Gates:

Thank you for joining me.

Jennifer:

Now Rowena has helped launch a device called the NanoVee and she has overseen much of the business development side, which includes working with some of the world's top thought leaders on health and fitness. And you know, I think I know a lot of people probably like to drop the name Tony Robbins, but I am a fan girl of Jim Kwik, so, like when I, I just he loves NanoVi and so I was like, what is this thing that I have to learn about? But honestly, rowena, I think that you have been kind of the face of NanoVi from the beginning, so could you tell us just a little bit about what exactly is it that NanoVi does?

Rowena Gates:

Okay, yeah, nanovi is a device first of all, and before that I'm also a huge fan of Jim Kwik. So it's a device, and what you're doing is inhaling the humidified air from the device, and what it's doing is influencing the cellular water in a way that supports the protein activities. And then there's a lot more to it beyond that, but that's sort of. The general idea is to improve the environment for proteins to do their work, and then they jump into action. Your body does what it's supposed to do, not what you know a pharmaceutical company thinks it ought to be doing.

Rowena Gates:

And it's just sort of supporting the body. It doesn't override anything.

Jennifer:

I love how you phrase that. You know I'm a huge fan of Richard Feynman, the theoretical physicist, and he always talked about how people forget what they already know. Right, and sometimes it's just helping people and in this case, sort of the body you know remember, or help it along to do what it, what it already does. And Hans Eng, who is the namesake of ENG3 Corporation, is, is really the mastermind behind the, the Nano V device and, like I said, we're going to talk to him on another podcast. But I think what he did, was he took, like you said, like what the already the body already knows how to do and it helps to do it better.

Rowena Gates:

Exactly so. It was relying on water science, biophysics, to look at what the body's doing, which includes a signaling process where the what's a free, radical or reactive oxygen species, which is widely damaging, but it also plays an important role by influencing the cellular water in a way that initiates repair and regeneration. And the way it's doing that, that, what we our initial device was only mimicking the specific wavelength was already known in biology to initiate this process, and so we mimic that wavelength. And then we've done extensive testing on both the device and its impact on people. But with the, the that testing we could show there's a more powerful, there are more powerful wavelengths, so you can even sort of up level the, the humidity you're breathing, to be even more powerful in the body. So it has the same influences, just that we can do it more effectively. And so that was added to the device and it basically made it more powerful. So, but other than the roots of it come from mimicking the biology and just augmenting it, Okay.

Jennifer:

So let's, let's talk a little bit about application that people can can relate to. All right. So my you had me at hello moment with you, rina was when you talked about how sitting and working and thinking for two hours is like running a marathon. It takes the same physical, you know amount of energy for the body to do the both of those things. And you literally answered a question that my husband and I had been debating, because he he's usually he works outdoors, builds things, right, and there was a period of time he he had to do a bunch of office work and he came to me one day and he said how do you sit all day and think and concentrate like that? He goes, I'm exhausted, I'm more exhausted than when I am out building stuff. And we wondered, we wondered, like, how much energy does the brain when you're thinking like burn through? So when you said that, I just found it astonishing. Can you talk a little bit about you know what happens, you know both with physical activity and with concentrated thinking.

Rowena Gates:

So if we kind of step back to oxidation, if you burn oxygen you have oxidation. As a result. It's like the exhaust from a car engine as long as you're running you're going to have that exhaust, unless it's electric these days and so that oxidation takes place. If you're burning the, you know, the energy in your brain, it takes place in your brain. If you're burning it in your muscles, then it takes place in the muscles.

Rowena Gates:

But the key is for your body to repair that damage on the fly and, you know, not let oxidative stress build up in the body. And but when you have things like brain fog or decision fatigue or just a general feeling of exhaustion from focus, those are all indications that your body's not quite keeping up to the in the repair side of things. And so once the damage outweighs the repair, that's what translates to oxidative stress, and it can be damaging, and so physically for physical activity or mental activity or just being or being exposed to toxins that cause issues as well. It's it's always that balance between repair and regeneration and the amount of damage done, and so that that's always the key. But when you feel unwell or you just can't quite recover and so on, then clearly there's more damage than there is repair and it's a really good idea to give yourself a break and do restorative things to get back into balance.

Jennifer:

So I know a lot of people talk about, you know, aging actually being the process by which damage outpaces repair.

Rowena Gates:

Yeah, and so that's the free radical theory of aging, which is, it's, pretty well accepted in many respects. It's not perfect, it's not the be all and end all, but there's no question that that build up of damage, oxidative stress, is at the heart of aging and at it it's implicated in every chronic disease. In every case, with these chronic age related diseases, if you can reduce oxidative damage, you end up reducing inflammation and helping the body come into balance, which are all the factors that are out of out of sorts for the disease.

Jennifer:

Right, and so when we're talking about repair, we're talking very specifically about protein repair and I actually still have my little guy from the conference. But I love how you described this is when your proteins are broken, you know, and they're like not folded exactly the way they need to be, then they're not functioning or not optimally functioning right, and my kids have played with this so much. It's actually kind of broken. But when you fix them, you know, they kind of like pop back up and they become functional again and I found that amazing that you could actually fix these broken and misfolded proteins. I had no idea that we could do that.

Rowena Gates:

Well, it's a huge ongoing process because inside the cell the proteins are the most abundant component and they can't count them, they're too small, but they estimate, you know, five, eight, 10,000 or more in each cell. And cells are really small, and so if you have a free radical in there, it's very likely to damage the protein. It might damage the mitochondria, the DNA, anything else, but it's very likely to hit a protein. And so they are kind of a primary subject of damage. But it's also proteins do all the repair. There's no other way to repair damage than protein activity.

Rowena Gates:

And so it's really this double sided thing where you want to keep the proteins working really well to get the repair done, and also by improving their environment, the watery environment, you can make them more stable so they're not as easy to damage.

Rowena Gates:

And we've shown both of those things with studies that show that if you use the nanov before you intentionally damage the proteins, they are more resilient and they do much better than the sham device or placebo device where they are actually treated. And then same thing with after damage, and after tends to be more profound. But a lot depends on the type of proteins and the type of damage, and so this study was three types of damage heat, chemicals and oxidation. And so the oxidation one's super interesting because we all have that all the time, because we're alive and we breathe oxygen and so. But the others are important too, because we're also exposed to other factors, and so that that suggests that when you improve the watery environment for the proteins, not only can you help them snap back into functioning, but you can also help them not be as readily damaged by the free radicals.

Jennifer:

Okay, so just to summarize, your proteins make up everything, right, I mean your tissues. They are the basis of all enzymes, for all the chemical reactions that happen in your body, but yet they're also the repairman as well. So I mean, it's almost like the doctor needs a doctor, right?

Rowena Gates:

Exactly, yeah, and yeah, and the enzymes are catalyzing these reactions and so enzymes are really key because they have that snowball effect if they can keep off the positive reaction. And that's why in the study actually they studied things like catalase, which is a catalyst and very important in oxidative damage.

Jennifer:

Now, you mentioned in your talk that there's over a million different proteins in the body and we've only identified like 50,000 of them.

Rowena Gates:

Yeah, and they don't know the exact numbers, like scientists might vary on what they think the whole number is, but we know so few of them I mean we're talking about naming them, let alone. They all interact with each other and do amazing things and we all those interactions and that will just it's, I want to say, impossible to sort all that out, but there's so many possibilities. And if a good example of that is the drug, interactions are unintended consequence of a drug and the best example of that is the heart medicine, viagra.

Jennifer:

Yes.

Rowena Gates:

And so that's a really good example is like well, who knew? But about 80% of the current pharmaceuticals are protein based. They're based on doing something to block a receptor or replace or whatever. They're all related. Almost all pharmaceuticals are related to trying to do something with the protein activities.

Jennifer:

So I want to get back to just roll briefly the device itself. Now, you mentioned that it is basically taking water, and what most people probably don't realize right is that we've discovered that there are different phases of water. Well, we knew that right. So we have solids, gases and things like that, but what we're talking about is in a different phase of water that is almost gel, like right.

Rowena Gates:

Yeah, you know, that's exactly my understanding and that's in the last 20 years here in Seattle. Jerry Pollock has really advanced understanding of water science and the idea that they can. It's measurable, it's repeatable at hundreds of labs all over the world that there's this fourth phase of water, which is like a gel and what it really means is that it's structured differently, so the water, the molecules, are more closely packed together and it's also described as a lattice or you know this, this gel like phase. It only occurs on surfaces and it will be within any water you drink will have some easy exclusion zone water or fourth phase of water. The reason it's called exclusion zone is because when the molecules are packed together, everything else gets pushed out, and so that's why it's excluded, it's pushed out, and so they call it exclusion zone water.

Rowena Gates:

But that is it's in every, it's in all water, some areas of this, but in ourselves what we really want is that layer of exclusion zone water or gel like layer to form around the surfaces of proteins, and they only form on the surfaces, and so this is essentially a reaction.

Rowena Gates:

To create this effect through the water is what we're doing. We're delivering the energy over here that will create the easy water on the protein, on any surface, but in our case we care most about proteins. And then the proteins need that energy state in order to fold and that's how it supports the proteins, because the protein is a chain of amino acids, it's it's unorganized, it's just lying there and it has to snap into a 3D structure and to do that it needs energy, and so it draws on the water for that energy. And it's that easy water that's highly ordered, that transfers the energy through entropy, so it's not heat or you know like we tend to think of waters, you know things like heat, but it transfers through energy. So the water becomes less ordered and structured and the proteins use the energy to become more ordered or to form its three dimensional shape.

Jennifer:

Okay, so the device, so the device is taking this water and you know, actually I have the device here, it's right here on my, on my desk.

Rowena Gates:

I love it.

Jennifer:

Yes, I love it, and you can see trying to wrap my microphone here. So it's water vapor that comes out here and you can just put it on your mouth or you can use tubing.

Rowena Gates:

I use the tubing too, because I use it while I work.

Jennifer:

Yes, I do the same thing, so you can just. You're just basically breathing in this water vapor that has gone through this machine, that and correct me if I'm wrong, rowena it passes through a very specific wavelength of light that structures it the way we need it to be structured this exclusion zone structure, and that's what we're breathing in.

Rowena Gates:

Yeah, the structure of the water molecule, the droplets that you're breathing in when they hit your mucous membrane, and the cellular water that the energy transfers through them and it creates the order on the surface of the protein.

Jennifer:

Okay.

Rowena Gates:

So it's not just directly breathing easy water and the protein folds. It actually kind of is like those, you know those balls you drop one here and the other one goes up and you drop one. It's kind of like that where it travels across the cellular water.

Jennifer:

Okay.

Rowena Gates:

That's one of the reasons it works throughout the system, because it just, it just travels across, it keeps transferring.

Rowena Gates:

Exactly, and so it doesn't matter if you've got inflammation in your foot or in your nose. It's still influential, which seems a little bit weird at first, because we're so used to things like being transported through the blood. Yes, but it's not working that way. It's working kind of across the water in the system, right, and the body's mostly water. It's. It's, you know, depending on your age, but it's usually, you know, 60, 70% water, and and is 99% of the molecules in the body are water.

Jennifer:

So I'm just thinking out loud here, I'm just curious. So so if we use red light therapy, are we potentially making more easy water with the water that's already in ourselves?

Rowena Gates:

It's interesting. So red light is is different and complimentary. It's going to work differently because it's really designed to go through to a certain depth. It's not going to be super deep you know it would burn if it were super deep and it actually hits directly onto something like the mitochondria or things that it can energize, and so it's. It's really more hitting the, the components, whereas we're just hitting the water and the fact that you can see the red light.

Rowena Gates:

If you hold up a glass of water, you can see the red light through the water. Our wavelengths you can't see because they're actually absorbed by the water and and so where red light goes through the water, our device is specifically designed to hit the absorption peaks of water, and one of those is the one we're mimicking. That's naturally known. It's up around 1200 nanometers. Red light is much, much lower number in the spectrum and that's where we discovered these higher numbers. So we've added wavelengths that are absorption peaks of water that are even more effective. So all we're trying to do is get the thing absorbed by the water. So we don't care if it's identical to the body or not Okay In that respect, but the red light won't won't be absorbed or you wouldn't see it on the other side of a glass of water.

Jennifer:

Gotcha All right. So here's just a question. So obviously our body makes proteins right, because that's what you know, that's what DNA does you know with the way of DNA, rna, and RNA makes amino acid chains and that folds, you know, into proteins. Does nanovie affect proteins that we ingest, you know, say through our you know our food, or how does it affect?

Rowena Gates:

It doesn't affect them directly. But what happens is when you ingest them, that means you're getting the amino acid building blocks. And so, let's say, you add collagen or collagen peptides, then you're you're sure to have those really important building blocks. When they go into the body, they get shredded down to individual amino acids, so they really just become the you know, the bricks that are going to be used later, and but by eating them it means they're readily available for your body to then create the proteins it needs.

Rowena Gates:

And so, let's say, for an athlete or a weightlifter I don't know if you know Ben Pekalski, but he's a wonderful guy and he does the, you know, the really heavy bodybuilding and so on they're, they have a huge need for building muscle and build and those collagen proteins, and that's the most abundant protein in your body. And so what it means is by he would undoubtedly eat more collagen than the rest of us and therefore he's got all the raw materials he needs for the body to then build the amino acids and the proteins. But everything we eat is completely shredded down to the lowest level of the. There's 20 amino acids, so it's one of the 20 and 10 of them we have to eat, and 10 of them the body makes on its own, and so the ones that we're supposed to eat are called the central amino acids, and that's why diet is so critical to good health.

Jennifer:

Yeah, thank you for explaining that, because I think a lot of times people get confused about you know, I felt a little.

Rowena Gates:

I was in the middle of it going on and on, and I realized that you know this stuff better than I do. No, no, no, no.

Jennifer:

But that's why, that's why I asked the question, because I think it's important that people you know realize that, no matter how you get your amino acids right, it could be ones that you make, and it could be from food that you eat, and and again, that's why nutrition and now I think I have a whole new respect for making sure that I drink enough water, you know, just you know, not realizing how essential water is to energy transfer you know, within the cells and with the protein, when you know I have a huge interest in brain health and that's why I like talking about, you know, things that affect the brain a lot.

Jennifer:

And you know, and I don't know how much you know about my background, but you know I am one of those people that you know gets their genetic tests back and the doctors like, oh my God, you're going to start coming down with Alzheimer's, you know, at age 40, you know, because you have. You have every risk factor known to man. So I really pay attention to Alzheimer's, neurodegenerative diseases in general. And you know, what's so astounding to me is, you know, when we talk about Alzheimer's, they are, they're always talking about this very specific proteins. It's a protein problem, right? And you know I shared with you yesterday that in a more more recent study came out showing that you know it's not necessarily the fact that you know the plaques are there out of these proteins, but it's. It's a difference in soluble versus insoluble forms of the protein. So interesting.

Rowena Gates:

I love that article. It explains so much and I think a lot of researchers are pretty skeptical about that simple, you know, approach of it's like oh yeah, the plaque fills up and that causes Alzheimer's. Like no, that's, that's not the cause.

Jennifer:

Like no, interesting and just to talk about that a little further, you know, I mean the fact that what they're saying is that it is the lack of soluble water, soluble amyloid beta protein that is causing the problem. It's not the plaque buildup, which is why, and that, like I said, I don't know how much you follow, but there's been over 40 Alzheimer's drugs invented and all of them have failed.

Jennifer:

Every single one in there, because they all focus on getting rid of the plaques, and not only do people not get better, they get worse A lot of the times.

Rowena Gates:

And I mean that's so scary to sign up for those trials. And it's really interesting because there was that non study that was done Forever ago and it showed that these aged nuns, when they looked at their brains, they these were women that were completely sharp until they died and they looked at their brains and they had all the plaques in there. It's just that then use their brains in a way that you know that they didn't see the effects of decline. And it should have been a hint, you know, to say there's something else going on here, because it's not just the cause, obviously.

Jennifer:

No, it's not, and I and I thought that the paper made a really good point. They said it's only too logical If you are detached from the current biases that we've created for too long, which means you know oh, we know plaque causes Alzheimer's disease, the nerve, that the neurodegenerative process is caused by something we lose rather than something that we gain.

Rowena Gates:

That's interesting for you also In the last year, last two years, they've really made massive advances in artificial intelligence to protect the folded shape of a protein, and the folded shape is that determines its function, that's how we know what it does, and so that research then suggests that there are proteins like that, that they may be able to create synthetically the water soluble version that's needed and basically make that as some supplemental somehow. That is really protective for people with cognitive decline or who might be susceptible to it. I mean, it's very, very hopeful.

Jennifer:

It is and I, just when I, when I read that, you know, I was like oh my gosh, this, this is. We've lost the function of a protein, and that's exactly what NanoV is trying to do is trying to get those proteins refolded and back to being functional. I'm just curious has NanoV been looked at in terms of helping preserve some of that function?

Rowena Gates:

Not formally, because we are a medical device and all of that work. To have an indication for a disease is just a massive, expensive proposition. We made the decision not to go that route because it would make it too affordable for people and it really was. What really excites us is to just help people, not have it be a massively successful commercial endeavor where you get indications for all these different diseases. We very intentionally don't study diseases directly, but we study the things like the protein damage which is associated, or it could be oxidative stress that's associated, or DNA damage which is associated to other issues. But we don't talk about those other issues and we obviously don't treat or cure anything. We just really focus on the underlying health of the cell and of a person and then how that shows up in any individual depends on their specific needs.

Jennifer:

I'm telling you that I am doing this so that I'm not getting Alzheimer's. I'm putting it out there. This is part of my Alzheimer's prevention treatment because I think it makes sense with what we know, with the current research that's out there that showing that it is a loss of a very specific protein function, that it just makes perfect sense for a way it does.

Rowena Gates:

What we can show and I can mention is, for example, a brain scan. If you do a brain scan before and after if somebody's very stressed, like they've had that mental focus so they may already have some brain fog, you can see the before and after difference in inappropriate brain activity. That's very likely reducing oxidative damage and helping the brain stay more fit. Even after one session you can see the difference in a brain scan. That's the kind of thing that's underlying. Well, sure, that affects cognitive decline. I mean you can feel it because you can't concentrate anymore or whatever. Those are the kinds of things we can talk about. But the actual diseases, oh, those are tricky.

Jennifer:

Okay, so what's your favorite like nano-V story, what's your favorite thing to talk about with nano-V?

Rowena Gates:

What's really fun for me and legal is the athletes, the pro-athletes, and of those my most favorite is the race car drivers. Because endurance I know I'm not that, really that type at all, but I really get going on the racing because endurance race car drivers are the pinnacle of physical and mental endurance. They drive for an hour or sometimes more and they make a life-important decision every two seconds or less. The concentration is unlike what we normally ever do and certainly not for prolonged periods of time. Then the physical part of it even though they're very sophisticated cars, it's very physical. I love that culmination of both of those things and they know what their recovery is like and how they're feeling and everything, and so those guys are especially fun for me. But we have a team that one of them says you know, I use it before I race, after I race, when I'm training. I wouldn't go out there without it.

Jennifer:

Oh, wow. So, let's say you have three different groups of people. So say, you have your athletes and then you have your non-athlete, everyday people like me, and then you have somebody who is currently suffering or recovering from a chronic disease or a bad illness or had to have a lot of surgery, something like that. How would you use NanoVe in those different populations?

Rowena Gates:

So in all of those cases it's about recovery. And we do have a lot of use I mentioned the pro-athletes but they use it for performance because it makes a difference in performance as well, but really it's about recovery and that the body does the repair and so it doesn't matter. Like I had a group out of Mexico City and it's a big center, you know that's adopted NanoVe and they want a different protocols for all these different things, which makes sense in health. But it's not really a different protocol for NanoVe, because they need to use it to support everything else they're doing and support this process, and it's not as if you'd use it 10 minutes before and three minutes after or something. And so for somebody who's chronically ill or somebody that's injured or somebody that's well and just wants to stay well, the biggest difference is how much time they should use it.

Rowena Gates:

And if somebody's already really challenged and ill, they should use it a lot more than somebody that's using it for wellness and they're just trying to maintain because they're trying to catch up. They are digging out of a hole at that point and we have a lot of experience with that. The first part of our existence was all chronic illnesses. It was always doctors integrative physicians usually that would use it for their chronically ill patients, and then we really switched over, because it's very hard to be in that world without you know medical claims basically, and so we do. We still have a lot of people that are challenged, but we do more with healthy aging and performance now.

Jennifer:

Okay, I know the it's you always. I know when you talk about it. You say you know you can use it for 15 minutes at a time and you'll get benefits. You know, I definitely use it for at least an hour every day.

Rowena Gates:

Me too.

Jennifer:

Yeah, and now my kids. It's funny. My son, he's 13. He's like one and done my daughter could. She thinks it's extremely relaxing. She loves the way the vapor feels in her nose and she could sit there all day Like with it on.

Rowena Gates:

Well, 13 year olds are notoriously hard to get to sleep and to get to wake up. That's just an age where they're you know, and it is. It can be really helpful to use before bed. I didn't even really know that, and a couple of people that use it I don't know if you know Kyla Barnes, but she works on brain health she said to me oh no, I use it every night before sleep and then I sleep better. And meanwhile I used it every day during the day and I was challenged with sleep and sure enough, I used it at night and it really helped me sleep. So now I do a session before I go to bed. Just, you know, 20 minutes, half an hour, and so for 13 year old, that might help him.

Jennifer:

Yeah.

Rowena Gates:

Yeah, Shift out of the sympathetic system into parathet sympathetic, which is another another thing we measure and we can demonstrate that it just helps the body kind of recenter itself.

Jennifer:

Well, I'm going to do that.

Rowena Gates:

He has a hard time like shutting down, so oh, yeah, they all do, though it's not, it's not just him.

Jennifer:

Do you have you looked at any differences in Nanavie with kids versus adults, or yeah?

Rowena Gates:

We really haven't. We've had it used by newborns even, and so we go. It kind of goes the whole spectrum that it's been, that it's been used for We've had a lot with. At one time especially, we had a lot with autistic kids. Autistic kids are all different. They're, they're not, you know, they're not all the same and so it's. It's one of those things that you have to see what works for your child and if it's not an issue with oxidative damage, a child should be healthy enough. They don't need a Nanavie device when they're you know little. It's only when they get you know if they're stressed or over overdone, which we tend to do that to kids. You know they're playing sports and all this stuff.

Jennifer:

Yeah.

Rowena Gates:

And so then that then it helps them, but they usually don't need to use it a long time to get a benefit from it.

Jennifer:

All right. So you mentioned earlier you know we talked earlier about red light therapy and you know what's really cool about Nanavie, I think, is that you can stack a lot of things easily with it.

Rowena Gates:

I do that all the time.

Jennifer:

I mean what? What are some of your favorite? Sex with Nanavie?

Rowena Gates:

Well, I use it with my red light and I mean I need to admit it, but I use it while I meditate with my red light and because I it just you can get, you know, more stuff done. And then I use it with compression boots.

Speaker 4:

Okay.

Rowena Gates:

And I, I don't have a big PMF, I only have the little PMFs, and so there would be times when I use them at the same time. And, let's see, I think those are the main ones I do. I don't think there's any other devices that I typically use it with. I use it with brain tap all the time.

Jennifer:

Okay, yeah, I just got one of those. I love brain tap yeah.

Rowena Gates:

But it's really complimentary. Patrick Porter once said to me they should have NanoV in every center that has brain tap. I'm like, yeah, they should, but they don't.

Jennifer:

Yeah, they should. I was just thinking Rowena. I was thinking the same thing because I go to a place here in Pittsburgh called Restore. It's like a wellness center. I have a membership there and I like to go get monthly infusions of vitamin C. What have you? I get so tired of taking so many supplements. I just want to go there once a month and get them all infused. I'm thinking, gosh, that would be so great if they had a NanoV. You could just do the vapor while you're getting your infusion. I mean, you could pair it with so many other things because they have To me. This just goes right along with all the other things that they have there the cryotherapy. They have the hyperbaric chambers. In fact I think you talked with Ella about the hyperbaric, we keep dying.

Rowena Gates:

then she went to Germany. No, they're absolutely complementary. A lot of cryo centers and a lot of hyperbarics have them. They increase the benefits of those two modalities. One floods your body with oxygen, then ours helps with utilization and with oxidative damage which has to occur. With cryo. They're stirring up cold shock proteins and heat shock proteins. If you're going to stir them up with cryo, why not make them work better with NanoV? I mean, it's a perfect complement.

Rowena Gates:

It really is the other one. You mentioned the drips, but we have a lot of use with NAD drips because they tolerate the drip better.

Jennifer:

Really yeah.

Rowena Gates:

They don't feel as unwell during the drip and then with vitamins. Then the other one we see quite a lot is neurofeedback. At 40 years of Zen they have four or something, because at 40 years of Zen they can measure. They do cap training, where you're really pushing your brain. Some of us find it the most challenging part of 40 years of Zen. They get a noticeable bump in what a person can do if they're using the NanoV while they do the cap training versus not using the NanoV. They always do it during cap training because they can get people to a higher level.

Jennifer:

For those of you who don't know what 40 years of Zen is, it's a program that you can go through by Dave Asprey. He created it but it's a whole biofeedback interventional program. I don't even know how to explain it but I have not been through it. But all of my friends who have been through it said it is literally transformational. You just can't describe it.

Rowena Gates:

It's really something. You spend a week there and they have really good food, which is not the only reason I went but it's really put together. There's all these different aspects of brain health and emotional health and so on that you can really upgrade yourself. It's called 40 years of Zen because you're meant to come out being much more calm and Zen-like at the end.

Jennifer:

Yes.

Rowena Gates:

It's good for any of us really we're mostly. Almost everybody has got a fair share of stress in their life, whether or not.

Jennifer:

I know my friend Dr Jen, dr Jen Haley. I've had her on the program a couple of times. She went during COVID because everything got canceled and it was right at the beginning so they were still open. She got to go and she was just like the support from other people that you feel when you go there. It's like you just walked into the best family gathering that you could have ever imagined.

Rowena Gates:

It's a special experience. It really is. Depending on where a person starts. I think it can be really up-leveling. The reason they really got going on that of you was because two of their clients that had gone back four times used it and they were setting new records for brain endurance, for how far they could push their brains. Because these guys are way out there on brain Then 40 years like this is like, yeah, we really should have this. Yeah, they're pretty exceptional guys. It's like your body a highly trained athlete is the same thing. They have highly trained brains.

Jennifer:

Yeah, I mean I think that, like you said, I could see NanoV being part of everybody's health and wellness center. I mean it just compliments so many things and it's so easy.

Rowena Gates:

You talk to those people at every store. It definitely is a fit. Yeah, actually, and just so you know if anybody out there has ideas, my goal is to get this into places like that or gyms where many people can share one device, because we love you know, we use it all the time and that's really wonderful that people can have their own. It's by far the best way to go. But financially that's not realistic for everybody and we really are very keen to make it more available to people and corporations. There's another place, like why not have one? 20 people a day can use it at a company and then it's much more accessible and it helps so many more people. If you could get it into these more public settings, I guess you'd say so. That is one of the things that's kind of on my to-do list. I'd really like to move that ahead.

Jennifer:

Well, that was actually going to be one of my closing questions is how do you really see NanoV evolving the use?

Rowena Gates:

that is it.

Rowena Gates:

It is already designed with the smart card technology so somebody could literally buy a card, you know, and then go and use the device and it deducts the minutes from the device, from the card, and so that is a big one to me, and that makes it accessible in other parts of the world that aren't, as you know, economically well off as we are.

Rowena Gates:

So that is an interest. The technology itself will not change in any dramatic way, and you mentioned Hansang at the beginning and I really want to shout out to him he really is the mastermind behind it and all that heavy lifting and that's. We've done a huge amount of testing and research on it, which is not always the case when you, when you see things that are being sold for health and well-being and that part is pretty, is pretty solid, and the technology there's not some low hanging fruit that we could change it in a way that made it even better. So we're really it's kind of set the way it is, which means our agenda now is to get it out and get people so they can use it and it can help people ideally as broadly as possible.

Jennifer:

Yeah, I completely agree, and it is. It's an investment in your health. I mean, if you're somebody that's thinking about purchasing one for home use, you know, like I have, it's an investment. And the only thing I can say is you know, I don't buy a new car every other year. I don't. I don't buy shoes or handbags or anything anymore. I save my money up and I buy biohacking devices. That's what I do. I've had the same car, for you know, I actually bought one car in my adult life. I've had the same car for nine years, the last nine years now, and I just I think it just depends on what your priorities are, you know, in terms of you know, you know health. But, with that being said, hopefully we can make this device, like you said, more available in public areas. When I got it, I saw that you had it. I didn't realize it was all set up for multiple users, with the card slot and everything that is very forward thinking.

Rowena Gates:

Yeah, that's Hans. Again, I can't take any credit. Yes, it is, and it would be really nice to go in that direction. That would be very helpful to a lot of people. It can be very beneficial to people with chronic illness, for example. There's always some of them in an office at work. It could be a really smart investment for a company to put that in. In fact, dave Asprey just released. His last blog post unless it's been replaced today was on corporate wellness and how to take care of employees with devices that are basically easy to use at work. You don't have to get undressed or sweat.

Jennifer:

Yes, exactly, I think I did read that. I think I read it a couple of days ago. Yeah, he was talking about how easy it would be just to put this in a room they have for breastfeeding moms like you have a wellness room.

Rowena Gates:

Yeah, it's so easy. You don't need a huge gym and you don't have sort of Right, I don't know. Yeah, it's very possible. I think that I hope that companies will move in that direction, as they really want to retain their best employees and they want to attract really good employees, and they really start investing in their staff, which is how it should be.

Jennifer:

Yeah, absolutely yeah. That's something that I never really thought about. I work from home, so I don't ever think about things in terms of what you can do on a corporate level, but that would be so easy, rowena.

Rowena Gates:

I know, I know I tried to nudge, like Nana featured obviously in that article, and I tried to just like, hey, we could discuss this, it's sort of my passion, but there's no interest. I didn't get any callback.

Jennifer:

Oh man.

Rowena Gates:

Well, I think it's where we need to go. I think we need to start looking at community health and corporate wellness and things that really are inclusive. You have to start out exclusive. The first Teslas were those little tiny sports cars that cost a fortune. That's how you get going, but after a time you want it to be available to everybody and inclusive. I think community wellness, corporate wellness, all those things are really important and we need to start thinking that way. Especially the people that can afford their own need to start looking at that.

Jennifer:

Yeah, I was just reminded, rowena. I think it was like two years ago I was asked to create a workshop for a company where I taught them basically how memory works. Their big ask was how can we keep our memory up? Because they were an older sales force and I'm just thinking At the time I was actually just parroting a lot of what Jim Quick talks about. I did that too. Yeah, I'm just like I felt like every five minutes I was saying and if you want to learn more about this, you can take Jim's Quick's course, you can read his book, blah, blah, blah. This would be a great solution to those people who wisely keep an aging population around because they have the wisdom of years, but yet supporting them.

Rowena Gates:

There's things like this and there are other possibilities too that just are tremendously helpful to anybody. Especially as they get older, that could make a huge difference For people that are low energy. They can notice that difference, whereas your son probably is never going to notice an energy difference. As people get older, things are a little slower. That's keeping an employee productive. There's a bottom line that makes sense in that scenario.

Jennifer:

Yeah, absolutely Great. Well, Rowena, if people want to learn more about Nanavie, what should they do?

Rowena Gates:

The easiest thing is ng3corpcom, which is E-N-G, and then the number three, e-n-g-3-c-o-r-pcom ng3corpcom there's information there, and then reach out to us, because most of our information isn't published at the website. If there's a specific condition or challenge that somebody's interested in, if they just phone we might have some insight on that. After that there's just a lot of the podcasts. We can point you to them too. But Jim Quicks, Dunwon, dave Asprey, luke Story, ben Greenfield, ben Pekalski, kyla Barnes there's a lot of podcasts out there too. Podcasts can be a great source of information. The one with Dave Asprey was done quite a long time ago now, but it goes quite a lot into depth on the technology because Hans and Dave get pretty nerdy on it. That's a great one. If somebody's interested in the actual technology, then Jim's is related to brain health and so on. There's quite a lot of those, which I think are a nice way to learn.

Jennifer:

Your website actually has a ton of information on it. I didn't realize that you had other stuff you could send. I know you're signed up for your emails and newsletters and you guys do a really good job of sharing clinical study information through your emails and newsletters.

Rowena Gates:

That's another thing. If you do sign up at our site, we don't spam you. You get stuff like study results. I'm just thinking we have an e-book that's related to cognitive function that you might be interested in. My dear, we can do that later.

Jennifer:

Yeah, absolutely Okay. Well, thank you so much, rowena, it's been a pleasure.

Rowena Gates:

Oh, it's such a treat to speak with you. Thank, you.

Speaker 4:

This podcast is for information purposes only. Any of the discussions or products held herein are not in any way offered as prescription, diagnosis nor treatment for any disease, illness, infirmity or physical condition. Any form of self-treatment or alternative health program necessarily must involve an individual's acceptance of some risk, and no one should assume otherwise. Persons needing medical care should obtain it from a physician. Consult your doctor before making any health decision. Statements and views expressed on this podcast are not medical advice. The podcast toast may have direct or indirect financial gains from products discussed on this podcast.

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