Autobiology with Jennifer Little-Fleck

Brainy Breadcrumbs to Success with Lori Lutz, Human Success Pioneer

January 09, 2024 Jennifer Little-Fleck Season 3 Episode 51
Autobiology with Jennifer Little-Fleck
Brainy Breadcrumbs to Success with Lori Lutz, Human Success Pioneer
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Episode 51. If you are starting something new in 2024, you need Lori Lutz in your life. Find her at: https://www.liveyourvision.co/ and connect with her on IG @live_yourvision.

Unlock the transformative power of personal support and corporate culture with me, Jennifer Little-Fleck, as I sit down with human success pioneer Lori Lutz in a dynamic conversation about the art of coaching and its profound effect on our lives.

Lori brings a wealth of experience and a refreshing approach to guiding individuals towards achieving a harmonious balance between their personal desires and professional ambitions. We tackle the complexities of adulthood support, and how the act of articulating your deepest wishes can lead to surprising revelations and a more fulfilling life.

Prepare to be astonished by the evidence we present on the value of putting people first in the workplace. A study we dissect proves that companies with an employee-centric approach can soar above the competition, with metrics that speak volumes about the power of respect, acknowledgment, and psychological safety. Lori and I dissect the nuances of career transitions, the role of a non-judgmental support system, and how a tailored coaching process can adapt to the unique needs of each client, ultimately leading to synchronized personal and professional goals.

As we wrap up this enriching session, Lori shares her insights on the growing necessity of life and business coaches, anticipating a significant rise in their importance. We emphasize the benefits of having a coaching partnership and the external perspectives it provides, which can spark immense personal growth. Our conversation leaves you with actionable strategies to embed a culture of well-being within businesses, the significance of recognizing small wins, and an inspirational quote from Abraham Lincoln that encapsulates the essence of living life with purpose. Visit LiveYourVision.Co for an exploration into these themes as you equip yourself to navigate life's challenges with renewed vigor and clarity.

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Speaker 1:

Hey, remember that great idea. You had that one time and you were just so excited and gung-ho and you started making plans and doing stuff. And it was kind of hard to keep that up, especially when you hit little hiccups and you needed somebody to talk through your ideas with or your process with and there really wasn't just anybody around that got it or got you. Or maybe that time or maybe it's now and you're realizing you want to go in a different direction with your career and you really could use a cheerleader behind you, you know, giving you that support you know we think about in movies all the time. You know the underdog and comes out of nowhere.

Speaker 1:

But they always had that one support person in the background. You know, maybe it was their spouse, maybe it was their mom and dad, maybe it was their grandparents or some uncle. You know just somebody somewhere supporting them and, you know, helping them take action and move forward. Well, I think we could all use somebody like that in our lives, and those people when you're an adult they're hard to find. So today I'd like to introduce you to Lori Lutz. She is a human success pioneer and I think she might be the person that you were looking for.

Speaker 2:

You're listening to Autobiology, the podcast where you can learn a little biology now so you can think for yourself later. Introducing your host who dreams of being on an episode of Star Trek as the quirky biologist who saves the day Jennifer Little-Fleck.

Speaker 1:

Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of Autobiology. Today I have with me Lori Lutz, who calls herself a human success pioneer, and I think that after looking at Lori's website which is amazing, by the way you have to check it out like everyone should have a Lori Lutz in their life. But, Lori, welcome. I want to formally welcome you to the program. How are you?

Speaker 4:

I'm doing well. Thank you so much for having me, and I have to say you just stole my line. Oh man, okay, okay, no to your audience. You, I mean, we don't know each other that well and I always say everyone needs a little Lori Lutz in their lives.

Speaker 1:

Shut up, really. You really say that oh my God, that's, that's, that's. But you know what? That's exactly what I got out of looking at your website. That's amazing. Yeah, okay, so your marketing is point on, or?

Speaker 4:

I don't, I don't push that. I usually just joke around with people that are close with me. But yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, all right, so now your business is called Vision. Yes, and I would love for you to explain like what exactly do you do for people?

Speaker 4:

Yeah. So who is Lori Lutz is a really great question. Hello, lori Lutz, here this chick and I have primarily worked behind the scenes, worked and lived behind the scenes and, as Jennifer just said, I am a human success pioneer, one that has led humans and the companies that they power to their optimum Right. So I am now ripping the curtain open and saying hello world, how can I help? So I am investing my time in folks, in achieving what matters most to them, so they can better show up for their families, for their friends, for their careers and, mainly, for themselves, in finding that balance and alignment of personal and professional priorities that we all need.

Speaker 1:

Do you find that people don't necessarily know what it is that they really want?

Speaker 4:

Yes, yes, and that is a portion of my branding a little bit. You probably didn't notice, but the idea of my business card, for example, it's. I don't know if you guys can see it, but it's like a blank canvas and they get to decide what their vision is and we collectively work through in finding it. Whatever they decide it is. I mean same with my website. I have like these paint swaps that people probably don't notice, but blank canvas, starting anew and just talking through what makes someone lighter, what lights a human up, and let's figure out how to incorporate that in the day to day.

Speaker 1:

I'm curious what do you think people would find most shocking about working with somebody like yourself, or just what sort of things have you stumbled upon in this coaching world that people would be like do a double take about.

Speaker 4:

Yes, I've been really enlightening to realize that not a lot understand the value of the coaching relationship in that impact it makes on your well-being and mental health. There was a I'm about to blow everyone's mind there was a 10-year gross study on over 50,000 brands and it found that the organizations that put the people in the center of it all outperformed the market by 350% 350%.

Speaker 1:

I'm going to say that again.

Speaker 4:

Yes, wow. So the market itself outperformed by 350%.

Speaker 1:

So you're saying, when companies focused on their employees, like their internal employees, not their consumers, not the customers, but the actual employees, the company as a whole then performed 350% better than their closest competitors.

Speaker 4:

Yes, because they're putting their people, the well-being of their people, at top. And you know, when those humans are feeling supported, feeling that love, how are they going to treat the clients Right? It's not mind-blowing. But what is mind-blowing is that people don't realize that's how much you can move the needle when you really bubble up that importance, that support of making sure that your people are at the center of it all. So vision was born from the idea that business and results are absolutely important, but it is investing in the humans and allowing them to find out who they are and realizing the control they have over their decisions, and that just once that light goes off, of course, they're going to show up for their careers.

Speaker 1:

You know. So how do we balance the fact that a lot of that has to do with managers, you know? And how can we, like you know, if somebody who's working comes to you and makes this discovery, you know, how is it that you work with them to, you know, to go from upwardly influenced managers to kind of realize this? Because that's the hard part, right, that's what I always run into in my training world is I always do what I can to pull in managers, because that's really where the power is and that's what I was going to say the leaders absolutely have to be involved.

Speaker 4:

I ran across a stat not too long ago that the number one job satisfaction is being aligned with your leader feeling respected, feeling heard, feeling seen the number one job satisfaction. So the leaders have just as much work as the humans you know running the machine.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I recently did a big project for a company and they had me put together a series of workshops from the book the Leadership Challenge by Kuz and Posner I'm not sure how to pronounce the last names, but it's like a leadership Bible, and one of the things I found interesting was how they said the number one thing that you could do to improve employee performance was to call out a person in front of all their peers about what a wonderful job they're doing. It took two seconds and yet it improved employee performance by some astounding number. I can't remember what it was, but they said it was also the most underutilized way to improve employee performance. At the same time, it's the easiest thing to do and yet the least thing done, so simple so simple and you have to relate it to.

Speaker 4:

You know, when humans are getting that encouragement and they're feeling happier, they're feeling lighter. That is a better existence for us all.

Speaker 1:

So you really kind of start the ball rolling. You provide that for people. You get them in that headspace where they are feeling respected, they are feeling heard, which allows them to sort of now open up their imagination, their possibilities. They start thinking about goals. So how would you describe your ideal client? Who is somebody that would really benefit from working with you? You know, everyone besides everyone Right well.

Speaker 4:

that answer seems so simple, but I am challenged by that because I'm not ready yet to put myself in a box. I'm not ready to have any limitations on who I'm helping. You know, I'm going to age myself for a second. We didn't call it coaching this the day. I spent 20 years leading humans of all generations and all backgrounds and we navigated life and career issues together. You know, I think what has been successful for me is that I am morphed to what the client needs in the moment. I will say a theme has kind of bubbled up recently and I don't know if it's the world or kind of the environment that we're existing in right now, but some major career transitions. You're probably not surprised by that.

Speaker 1:

I am not, but yes.

Speaker 4:

I'm leaving a gig without even knowing what's next to craving that better balance that we just kind of talked through balance and alignment of personal and professional priorities, but then also some really wanting to reinvent themselves.

Speaker 1:

So what does it look like when somebody works with you? Can you kind of walk me through like what you do in that process?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, first off, safety, respect. You know a judgment-free and supportive space. I love outside perspective, good and bad, you know. It's really what develops us, and I have a client that explained my unique ability was how I tactfully blend compassion with performance. It had me thinking, though. Why is that unique? Everyone deserves a partner to ideate with, to talk things through, to scream, to cry, to jump for joy, you know, all the while feeling really comfortable in their own skin. So there's a bit of structure to my way for accountability purposes, but the time is my clients. You know I am not in there day to day. So if we need to pivot from what we were focused on, the previous connect that's taking too much real estate up in their mental space, then we do that.

Speaker 1:

Okay. So I completely agree with you on the whole psychological safety thing. So you work on individual people, but I work on entire sales forces with that same principle in mind and I love what you're saying about you have to make it so that you can offer up an additional perspective, but not make it feel like you're judging how they're thinking at the same time. And you're right, that takes a lot of tact. But once you explain to someone not only why, what the response is in the brain when you do that, you know, you know where I'm going with this, but once you make people aware of it, it's like a huge aha moment. So do you find that once you start teaching people, you start showing people how to do that, because you're doing it with them, that they can turn around and kind of do it with the people in their lives as well?

Speaker 4:

Absolutely, absolutely. So, as far as you know, depending on where people get their education, you don't necessarily need certification, accreditation, in the coaching industry, but depending if you do, depending on where you go, a lot of it is just pulling out the ideas that naturally live inside all of us. I worked my tail off for 20 years for life and career experience, so the consulting part of my business is a little bit of that outside perspective. But I always ask permission, so I'm listening to what they're saying and then if something, after we take a pause, if something kind of bubbles up in my mind of what worked for me, I'll insert that and say, hey, this was just how it worked, how it landed with me. It won't necessarily be the same way, but would you like to talk that through? And I think just having that open dialogue is where folks feel really comfortable and they start to open up with you and then they can take that to their lives, their personal, their professional lives.

Speaker 1:

So I think that when we talk about this kind of stuff, some people like myself, who also did a big, major career change at some point, and typically when you do that, you did it, I did it it is kind of scary and you need somebody to talk to that can keep your eye on the prize.

Speaker 4:

Absolutely.

Speaker 1:

But at the same time, it is really hard sometimes to formulate goals, and what I found was that even when somebody asked me the direct question, what do you want? I found it really hard to put it into words, did you see?

Speaker 4:

me kind of run around of like who's my client? Yeah, yeah. I think we all deal with that and I think that's okay. Everyone is going to be different and that's the beautiful thing about all of us and it's just providing that support and that structure that a lot don't even realize they need.

Speaker 1:

I think everybody needs that and I kind of like hearken back to the guidance counselor in high school, yeah, where they were. Just they were trying to kind of like nudge you into thinking about like, well, what do you want to do with your life, or what are you, what are you interested in? But then I feel like we got into with adults, you know we started hearing about life coaches. But I feel like it was introduced in a way that people didn't understand what that meant and it got a lot of you know people kind of made fun of it. Like it became the butt of a lot of you know Saturday night live skits about you know, having life coach. Like what does that mean, you know? But but it is sort of like having that person to help you figure out what's next.

Speaker 4:

Absolutely.

Speaker 1:

Or to see the things that you don't see, to offer up those other perspectives, things that they probably never even thought of.

Speaker 4:

One of my favorite things that I hear from a client when we're connecting is oh, I wouldn't have thought of that. Oh, I wouldn't have ever done it that way, you know, and that, to me, gives me so much joy when I hear that I mean, they don't see me like, but that's what I'm doing internally.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yeah, so so what? So, speaking of that, what does success look like to you when you're working with a client?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, you know, one of my favorite experiences we worked together for nine years and so you just can imagine a lot, of, a lot of growth during that that period. And they were this insecure. You know, quiet but beautiful flower that didn't quite know their potential or absorb it personally or professionally. And, jennifer, today they are this rock star. And I'm talking in all aspects of life. You know, career, partner, parent, and because we're so close, I often jokingly bring up, you know, back in the day do you remember all that resistance I dealt with, right? Well, look at you and you know.

Speaker 4:

Another example of success is speaking of the career transition. I work with a individual that their contract wasn't being renewed. It was a shock. They are the breadwinner kiddos. So just imagine the heaviness, that, that impact of not having that trajectory that they can count on. But through the work and the drive they are in the best place that I couldn't have even imagined.

Speaker 4:

And normally I'm like they don't see it. I try to hold my emotions, not like I'm doing today, but I try to hold back my emotions of you know. But I mean it's just mind blowing and the best place that they're in. This new gig, this new organization sees them, hears them, which they didn't really announce that those were their core values, but they were. And one of the best things about, aside from this organization supporting them is they just recently shared that their partner gave them a hug and said it's so good to have you back. I know I mean I'm going to cry Like and it was record time that we worked through all this and it's just amazing. It lights me up. It hopefully lights them up.

Speaker 1:

So I think there's a huge mental health aspect to what you do. You know, it's not just helping people figure out where they want to go, but it's keeping them in the right headspace to get there. There's a lot of problems in the world right now in terms of mental health. I'm just curious, like, what your take on things are right now with that.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I mean it is. You know, it is so serious that we need, as humans, just to be over sensitive and aware. I there, there, I'm going to throw some. I love stats, you know. You know me that I'm a nerd, but I'm going to throw out some stuff here. One in three employees, and this includes executives, struggle with fatigue and poor mental health. 56% of employees don't feel as if their leadership it cares about their, their mental health. In 91% of the leaders, the executives think their employees think they care about it. That is such a sad disconnect. We can do better, Wow.

Speaker 1:

That is a huge disconnect. I mean, I'm just thinking back to you know all the corporate jobs I had and my first quote, you know, home office corporate job I ever had. I really felt like that company cared about me and that you know, I was part of like the family and and that was probably true for the first, like I worked for that company for 12 years for the first seven years and then I found, I saw, I felt this change happen in the early 2000s and you know, you could feel that the tides were turning. People were not treated the same way anymore. There were, there were. I mean, I actually remember getting like my five year work anniversary gift from my company. I got a 10 year anniversary gift from my company. Like who does that anymore? Because people don't stay at a company for like more than three years anymore. There's, there's, I mean, and it's because they're constantly being made to feel like they're not valued.

Speaker 4:

I think I agree, I agree. I remember it one of my first careers back in the day and I think I had been there maybe for eight years at this time, and there was a contract worker and he was he was younger than me and was just like how long have you been here? And I was like eight years. He was like what? Like I think that that is even seen, whereas before it was highly respected, like highly respected. Yes, you didn't want to see when you were hiring people. You didn't want to see 20 different jobs.

Speaker 1:

No, it was a red flag you want to see the loyalty, yeah, and now it's the complete opposite, yeah. Wow, that is crazy to think about how that's changed. All right, so what are like three things that you wish people knew when it came to?

Speaker 4:

you know, balancing or career coaching, or just you know in general, yeah, so I think you know this about me If you follow me either via LinkedIn or Instagram I always tend to incorporate nerd tips, is what I call them. You know, really, brain focused on what you know. People should know how to improve, you know, their cognitive, et cetera. So I want to share three of my favorites, and we'll start with the first nerd tip and this one is an innocent act of from families and friends. When someone's venting and experiencing kind of a heavier moment, our first reaction is like what that's crazy, don't you feel so outraged? Well, we need to roll back from that, because what happens in that scenario is that we are forcing them to re-experience that emotion, and you know this and that builds a new neural pathway that encompasses negativity and pain, and you know us being a cheerleader and rallying around our friends and family. That is the last thing we want to do. So I think that's the first one that I think we all should be mindful of.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I have to give my commentary on this.

Speaker 1:

Okay so just for the audience like this is why Lori and I met, because we were both huge brain nerds, huge neuroscience nerds, and I can't like I literally can't believe you just said that because I just released a podcast last week with Dr Lynn Morrell, who is a trauma therapy specialist, and she is different from all the other trauma therapy specialists I've ever met because that's exactly what she said. Other therapists make you relive the trauma over and over and it creates this, you know myelinated neural pathway in which you are constantly recalling that instead of just dealing with it and moving forward with what you're going to take from this experience and do do differently, or how you're going to enhance your life now that you've had this experience. So I couldn't agree more with you.

Speaker 4:

I love timing and that's wild, so I obviously need to listen to that one. But but yeah, I mean we're united, we're on the same page, yes, yes, okay. So nerd tip number two Our amygdala. You know that frontal portion of our temporal lobe gets hijacked. It literally stops functioning when we experience an emotional overwhelm of stress. You know activating that, fire, flight freeze mode and some of the simplest things that we can do to reset our nervous system. Now stick with me. This one's a little silly, but you'll see animals doing it all the time, and Taylor Swift did sing about it. Shake it off, shake it off.

Speaker 1:

Yes.

Speaker 4:

And I get it. We're not always going to be in an environment where we can do the shakes or a silly dance. So find that, practice that deep breathing, something to reset your entire nervous system so you can gain back control of that amygdala.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yes, that's I mean. You know, I teach all about the amygdala to my sales folks, you know, because what we're trying to do is make sure that we don't set off the amygdala when we're having a conversation with someone. So I teach it from that perspective. But you're right, a lot of the times people are already in amygdala hijack or we're in amygdala hijack because we're nervous about the you know upcoming conversation. You know something like that, and we need lots of ways to reset the amygdala, both in ourselves and in, you know, our audience, the audience we're speaking to.

Speaker 1:

And I can't stress enough what you said about how, when you are in amygdala hijack or the person you're speaking to is an amygdala hijack, your prefrontal cortex or you worst, which is where all your executive functioning happens, your critical thinking, you know how you make decisions, how you learn where, what and if you're going to store a memory of whatever's being said to you, it temporarily shuts down when you are in hijack and if you think about it, it makes a ton of sense, right? Because if your body thinks you're an imminent danger, you don't have time to figure out an algebra equation, no, you want to get the heck out of there, and so your body shuts off thinking and you just, you know fight, flight, you know freeze, you know if your buddy rabbit, you know or or fawn, which means you just nod your head and agree, and so you can get the heck out of there. So I love what you're saying, you're right. I agree with you wholeheartedly with point number one and point number two so far.

Speaker 4:

All right. And number three is my favorite, so narrative. Number three is that we build the thickest synaptic connections in our brains when we're engulfed in activities that we love. When brains are being scanned and we're doing something we love, they literally light up. So if we can find 20%, that's all 20% of love in what we're doing. It ignites this energy, this feeling of resilience and that sense of fulfillment. 20%, we can all do that 20%.

Speaker 1:

So what you're talking about, from what I explained, is called long-term potential, and when we can, like you said, make it very personal, we make it very personal. It stays with us but it also does. It actually restructures the synapse in those neurons and it makes it stronger and stronger and stronger, so that not only are we more easily able to recall it is what we're doing, but we have fond memories about it and we can build on that neural network much easier because it's strengthened. And then we have the whole neurons that fire together a wire together thing. I love them. You know, have a postulate. So, yes, I wholeheartedly agree with you with number three as well. It does a lot of times come down to the brain and if you understand the brain you can understand how to change yourself and how to better interact with others.

Speaker 4:

And, once you know, spread it out. That's what I'm trying to do Sprinkle it out. When everyone has that knowledge, it's so powerful and just everyone's able to live a little bit lighter, be a little happier in their life. Life can be hard. Let's lighten it up.

Speaker 1:

And I think people forget that they have the ability to choose how they want to show up, and if you're not happy with how you're showing up, then they need to get in touch with someone like yourself that can show them how to make those changes. And I think the most important part of this and I keep going back to this is people know that they want to make a change, but they don't necessarily know either how to do it or exactly what it is that needs changing. Do you find that a lot too?

Speaker 4:

And I think, through conversation and open dialogue and going back to that safe space where it's okay to say whatever's on your mind so that we can dive deep and figure it all out together. It's having that partner. I went in, I saw Chelsea Handler recently and she had an opener, vanessa Gonzalez who, by the way, is hilarious, so I highly recommend her. And she said she was talking about therapy, but in this dynamic it's in relation to. It can be with coaching too. She said I pay for a Bestie and that's what I am. I am your Bestie, I am your partner, I am your ride or die, so that you can navigate life and feel a little bit lighter, because most people don't even realize they need that in their life to feel better, be better.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, people need somebody to talk to. Everybody needs that one person they can just call up and they can just spew out whatever is going on, with no judgment, and somebody's just going to listen, if they just need to listen, and they're also going to have the ability to make suggestions or provide advice, if that's what's asked for. A lot of people don't have that. A lot of people. Yeah, that's sad. Do you think that that's going to change, though? I feel like it's going to change. If you fast forward five, 10, 20 years, how do you see what you do evolving?

Speaker 4:

Yeah To answer in short, it's going to be a lot busier. There are going to be businesses and folks independent of organizations that really start to understand the value and the impact it has on mental health and well-being. That's what I really see in that. Probably five, 10, even 20 years this is going to be. It's going to get a lot busier. That means the existence of humans will be a lot better because they have that partner to talk through things, even if there's not anything on their mind in the moment. Opening up that dialogue with those great questions and something will bubble up.

Speaker 1:

I don't have a one-on-one relationship with a life coach, but I do belong to a group. It's like a business slash life coaching community. We talk seven days a week. It's very comprehensive. That's something that I found out that I really needed, just even as a solo entrepreneur, because it's a lonely business. Being in business for yourself there's so. The other thing is and you mentioned this too earlier we don't know what we're really good at. Sometimes we need somebody else's perspective to kind of like give us like this is how I see you. You know, here's where I think your strengths are, here's what I like about how you do this, and you can't be that objective about yourself. You need somebody to kind of do that for you.

Speaker 4:

That outside perspective is invaluable. It's what has made me grow. You know it helps everyone, good and bad. Like I said, it really develops us. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So when I just in this conversation, when I think about what you do and how you actually started doing this within your own organization, I don't know, I feel like you're almost one of those people that could be a consultant for an actual business too and not just like individually Like businesses can hire you to kind of, you know, provide that touch point.

Speaker 4:

Absolutely so. I we talked a lot about individuals and I also, I also offer for organizations and it's the ones that really care about the well-being of their people. So, kind of folding me into and we would start having, we would have one-on-one and group connects, depending on, you know, everything will be custom but depending on their need, their pain points, they would fold me in as, like you said, a consultant, you know, a trusted advisor, to kind of fold in and speak with their, connect with their employees, one-on-one and then group connects, because that engagement, especially in the groups, you know this, oh yeah, so I do see that the culture amp up because they feel so good, you know, being able to save space, talk in the room with one another, with colleagues. So, yes, that's a piece of my business as well.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think. I mean. I know, in my community I'm really encouraged to share even the smallest of small wins on a daily basis. You know, I mean it could even for you know, and for some people it's literally you know what I got up and I got on this call, like you know, you know that is a huge win for them, you know, and you know, and then you know some of us it's, you know, being able to get a new client. For some of us it is. I made it home for dinner every single day, just you know, and had dinner with my family, you know. Or I didn't work over the weekend, you know, I mean even just small, small steps towards that balance and goal.

Speaker 4:

I talk about that so much like we need to celebrate those small wins because you're going to look back one day and be like, yeah, because it adds up to so much more.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean, I remember thinking like, oh my God, there's no way that I could, like I could spend, you know, half an hour on a phone call every morning with strangers, like who has time for that, you know? And now I'm like, if I don't talk to these people, like I, you know, because here's the other thing that happens, because I know, like it's what we call this priming, because I know that every single day that there's a group of people waiting to hear like what awesome things happened to me, I start looking for awesome things to happen to me, that I keep track and I write down and I have this wins journal and then, you know, then we're encouraged to look over it and be like, wow, really good things are happening to me.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, and that's so good because you're tracking it and you have that journal like. One of the simplest tools is to write those down so that you can reflect back, be like oh yeah, I did do that, that was amazing, so that's so smart.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, I and I Dr Lynn and I were talking about this too is and you mentioned this earlier as well just being able to get your feelings out either verbally or on paper just helps tremendously when you are trying to figure out how to balance and move forward or get yourself out of hijack and things like that.

Speaker 4:

That's, that's the simplest and it's you know this, it's a neuroscience tool. It is a neuroscience tool. Even if you leave it, just write it down.

Speaker 1:

All right. So what is if you could pick, like just one thing that you want to leave people with today, like what, what's probably the most important message that you have that you want to leave people with?

Speaker 4:

Oh, great question. I'd like to share a quote by Abraham Lincoln. It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.

Speaker 1:

Let's live, let's live, so your website, ironically enough, is called liveyourvisionco. Liveyourvisionco and you are the Lori Lutz. Yes, and if, if people want to learn more about how you can help them and structure, you know, identify and structure a path forward to help them reach their goals and help them become a success story. All your information is there. Yes, and what other ways can people follow you or get in touch with you?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so the website liveyourvisionco. There's a let's explore page that you can fill out and it comes directly as well as I'm on LinkedIn, the Lori Lutz, so you can find me there, and then on Instagram is just the handle. Is live underscore your vision.

Speaker 1:

Okay, great. Well, thank you so much, lori, for your time today. You know, like I said, like you know, 10 years ago, if you'd say life coach, people were like woo, woo, like why, why do I need this? And now, today, I think it has a much different meaning and it's it's literally that adult guidance counselor that everybody needs to help them figure out what it is that they truly want and figure away, figure out a way to, to reach that goal.

Speaker 4:

Absolutely Live lighter, always. All right, thank you so much, Lori.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much for having me Bye, for now Bye. Thank you, thank you.

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